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Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology aka FIPP

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June 13, 2014, at 11:56 AM EST by 217.13.106.26 -
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September 15, 2009, at 12:33 PM EST by fodormik -
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DOWNLOAD:

  • Free e-book: academic style description of FIPP (.pdf, 100 pages, 1 MB)
  • Short introduction to FIPP (.pdf, 6 pages, 0.6 MB)
  • Poster presenting the model (.png, 0.7 MB or .pdf, 7.7 MB)
September 07, 2009, at 10:13 AM EST by fodormik -
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(:drawing narrow:)

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With the help of the concepts of Self-Narrowing and -Expanding we can characterize human behaviour in the following pattern:

'''the establishment of a new cognitive scheme changes the course of Self-Narrowing and converts it into Self-Expansion.'''

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With the help of the concepts of Self-Narrowing and -Expanding we can characterize human behavior in the following pattern:

the establishment of a new cognitive scheme changes the course of Self-Narrowing and converts it into Self-Expansion.

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Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment (i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

to:

Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment (i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

September 07, 2009, at 09:52 AM EST by fodormik -
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  • The cognitive schemata are the basic elements of thought. By structurally modelling the outside world they assist in the perception of the Environment for the Self (similar to a translation of the physical world to mental elements). For example, these are concepts (sleeping, solution, equation), shapes (sphere, whole, angular), categories (vertebrates, impressionist, business people) and technologies (tying bows, hitting a forehand, solving quadratic equations). The formation of a new schema creates a new model of the Environment; using that new model the Self is able to structure and perceive, control and react to its Environment.
to:
  • The cognitive schemata are the basic elements of thought. By structurally modelling the outside world they assist in the perception of the Environment for the Self (similar to a translation of the physical world to mental elements). For example, these are concepts (sleeping, solution, equation), shapes (sphere, whole, angular), categories (vertebrates, impressionist, business people) and technologies (tying bows, hitting a forehand, solving quadratic equations). The formation of a new schema creates a new model of the Environment; using that new model the Self is able to structure and perceive, control and react to its Environment.
September 07, 2009, at 09:51 AM EST by fodormik -
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Below we present a model that explains a great deal of some aspects of human behaviour. The model describes diverse kinds of human behaviour – from religion to sex and from problem solving to intimate relationships – with the help of just a few basic concepts. At the same time, its results are congruent with those of the determining psychological schools and sub-sciences – analytic, cognitive and social psychologies – and explain them in a broader context. It integrates knowledge of human behaviour found in common sense and the world religions, with the science of psychology. As we feel that we have managed to identify the key elements of human behaviour, we do not consider it an exaggeration to propose that our model be used as the conceptual framework of psychology.

to:

Below we present a model that explains different aspects of human behavior. The model describes diverse kinds of human behavior – from religion to sex and from problem solving to intimate relationships – with the help of just a few basic concepts. At the same time, its results are congruent with those of the determining psychological schools and sub-sciences – analytic, cognitive and social psychologies – and explain them in a broader context. It integrates knowledge of human behavior found in common sense and the world religions, with the science of psychology. As we feel that we have managed to identify the key elements of human behavior, we do not consider it an exaggeration to propose that our model be used as the conceptual framework of psychology.

September 07, 2009, at 09:42 AM EST by fodormik -
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DOWNLOAD:

September 06, 2009, at 10:10 PM EST by fodormik -
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Important: these relationships are dynamic, and being subjective constructs they can scarcely be interpreted in terms of numbers. The emphasis is on their relationship with each other and on how the Self experiences its relationship with the Environment. (For example, although we see a heavy storm about to hit a sailboat at sea, it does not mean that the Environment – the sea – controls the Self of the captain. As long as he does not notice the storm, the captain can feel that he controls the sea and his boat)

When the Self is narrowing, its energy continuously decreases. When the Self is expanding, its energy continuously increases.

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Comment: the new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The integration is a process when the old opposing schemata fall into smaller pieces (into their composing cognitive schemata) and from these pieces a new one arises that contains the major characteristic of the two previous ones. The new is superior to the two old ones. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the birth of the new cognitive schema deadlock

to:

The new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The integration is a process when the old opposing schemata fall into smaller pieces (into their composing cognitive schemata) and from these pieces a new one arises that contains the major characteristic of the two previous ones. The new is superior to the two old ones. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the birth of the new cognitive schema deadlock.

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(:include ad:)

September 06, 2009, at 10:07 PM EST by fodormik -
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The Self and the cognitive schemata are only partly comprehensible to others. Getting to know completely another person’s cognitive scheme is impossible, even people to using well-defined, similar schemata (e.g. the definition of the line in mathematics is very clear and precise, someone imagines and uses it as a string, another as a thin wire, and a third as a pearl necklace. Even if their concepts on the line would have been shared with others, they would also have to share their concepts of string, wire, pearl and so on.). Interpersonal communication (due to the limitations of the data transfer process), usually conveys, compared with what they have in their mind, a simplified form of cognitive schemata amongst people.

The Environment is completely subjective, and accessible only for the Self that developed and uses it. It is partly free from the physical reality since it was created by the Self deciding what it wants to perceive from it and what it does not.

Important: the independence from physical reality described above does not contradict the fact that the Self tries to model, understand and adapt to the physical world successfully through discovering its rules and relations with the help of cognitive schemata.

August 07, 2009, at 03:55 PM EST by fodormik -
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August 07, 2009, at 03:53 PM EST by fodormik -
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  • Free e-book: Academic style description of FIPP (.pdf, 100 pages, 1 MB)
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  • Free e-book: academic style description of FIPP (.pdf, 100 pages, 1 MB)
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  • Poster presenting the model(.png, 0.7 MB or .pdf, 7.7 MB)
  • Video introducing FIPP (.avi, 6:53, 132 MB)
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  • Poster presenting the model (.png, 0.7 MB or .pdf, 7.7 MB)
August 07, 2009, at 02:29 PM EST by fodormik -
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While playing the video press the "HQ" button (in the right bottom corner of the YouTube player) in order to improve playback quality

August 07, 2009, at 12:42 PM EST by fodormik -
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August 07, 2009, at 12:36 PM EST by fodormik -
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August 07, 2009, at 11:30 AM EST by fodormik -
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  • Free e-book: Academic style description of FIPP (.pdf, 100 pages, 1 MB)
July 30, 2009, at 11:12 PM EST by fodormik -
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July 29, 2009, at 07:23 PM EST by fodormik -
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Introduction

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Introduction

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July 29, 2009, at 07:19 PM EST by fodormik -
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July 29, 2009, at 07:19 PM EST by fodormik -
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  • Short introduction to FIPP(.pdf, 6 pages, 0.6 MB)
  • Poster presenting the model(.png, 1.5 MB or .pdf, 7.7 MB)
  • Video introducing FIPP (.avi, 6:53, 132 MB)
July 29, 2009, at 06:41 PM EST by fodormik -
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July 29, 2009, at 06:38 PM EST by fodormik -
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FIPP (Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology)

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FIPP (Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology)

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July 29, 2009, at 05:36 PM EST by fodormik -
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FIPP (Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology)

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FIPP (Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology)

July 29, 2009, at 05:35 PM EST by fodormik -
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Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology (FIPP)

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FIPP (Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology)

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Download in high quality (132 MB - 6:53)

(:youtube ZSMTFMgEtfk:)

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Download a video presentation (132 MB - 6:53)

January 01, 2009, at 08:19 PM EST by fodormik -
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Two comments on the relevant texts

  • Man’s psyche is a complicated entity and I trust so much that there is no sole truth, that I’m able to reason for and against my statements. This does not mean that these statements are untrue. Rather, it means that every single question should be judged uniquely. As there is no perfect formula in psychotherapy, only principles and basic relationships – the opposite of which sometimes prove to be true – which contribute to unique therapies. Similarly, there are no strict laws in a science so complex.
  • Reading through the whole text one may have the feeling that I am trying to force my point of view – however ethical – on others, and therefore it is merely an unscientific constraint. The one truth in this statement is that I live according to my scientific beliefs; the main source of my observations is my life. Nevertheless, I emphasize throughout that there is no perfect way, for example, in the case of reaching happiness. Apart from this I can presume which way is perfect for me, or which one suits me best, and it is possible that I cannot completely hide this. Here I state that there is no redeeming way, only that there are some ways which have more chance to redeem. In addition, I undertake this calmly as I believe that all of them are part of millennia old multicultural ethics.

Is there anything new in this? As I think that we are speaking about obvious and well-known things, it may be perceived that we are merely re-invented the wheel.

How can we ensure that the opposite happens? We examine similar and opposite models, and find out if they are more precise than our theory. As our hypothesis is that we are inspecting the deep roots of real life, we are not allowed to scorn human experience collected throughout millennia by saying that it says nothing scientific. Rather, my assumption is that human cultures, via poetry and philosophy, have always felt that which is being discussed, but have never put it in words so precisely. Furthermore, it has been never placed according to the rules of psychology or other sciences.

Competing concepts

  • deadlock
  • reference group
  • pride – shame
  • masculine – feminine
  • ying – yang
  • art – psychology
  • altered states of consciousness – hypnosis

Further thoughts (to help obtain a deeper understanding of the model)

  • the life course of paradigms
  • the techniques of making the Self narrow and expand
  • the concept and definition of psychological health
  • asymmetric relationships and their aims
  • ensuring anonymity
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(:include ad:)

January 01, 2009, at 08:17 PM EST by fodormik -
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Examples

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Example

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Example 1

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Example 2

Let us suppose that somebody has some mathematical knowledge, and has solved hundreds of quadratic equations (e.g. x2=4 or -2x2=-8) They now face the following problem: x2=-4. What happens?

  1. In using the existing cognitive schemata they realize that they do not work
  2. "Am I doing something wrong?" The schema is repeated many times without success.
  3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding equations as useless.
  4. They then explore complex numbers; “What if I define i as a result of the equation i2=-1?”
  5. It works! The solution is 2i, as (2i)2=4*(-1)=-4. Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive scheme has been created!
  6. As they see that it works, they feel:
    1. additional energy; and
    2. an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema.
  7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the use of complex numbers.
  8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important)
January 01, 2009, at 07:30 PM EST by fodormik -
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(:include ad:)

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(:keywords psychology, self, paradigm, communication, environment, altruism, aggression, sex, enlightenment, happiness, problem solving, religion, Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, relationship, couple, model, cognitive schemata, cognitive :)

(:description COMMUNICATION IMPERATIVE; DEFINING SELF AND ENVIRONMENT; EXAMPLE OF THE USE OF FIPP; FIPP-PATTERN; SELF-EXPANSION AND SELF-NARROWING;Defining the FIPP's basic terms: Self, Environment and cognitive schemata. * The FIPP-pattern: Self-narrowing and Self-expansion. * Converting Self-narrowing into Self-expansion with a new cognitive schema. * Spreading the word of that new schema. * The model in action: an example. :)

October 16, 2008, at 09:43 PM EST by fodormik -
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Download in high quality (132 MB - 6:53)

(:youtube ZSMTFMgEtfk:)

October 11, 2008, at 10:47 AM EST by fodormik -
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(:drawing steps:)

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(:drawing steps:)

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Pattern

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The FIPP-Pattern

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  • Roads to Happiness (promiscuity, religions, confession, narratives, altruism, foundations, research, art, art collecting, family, wealth, travelling, gaining knowledge, reading, collecting, death, heaven and hell)
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  • Paths to Happiness (promiscuity, religions, confession, narratives, altruism, foundations, research, art, art collecting, family, wealth, travelling, gaining knowledge, reading, collecting, death, heaven and hell)
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Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment (i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

to:

Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment (i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

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trail | Arts >

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trail | Arts >

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  • Intimate relationships (self-surrender, sovereignty)
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(:toc:)

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Introduction

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(:title Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology aka FIPP:)

August 24, 2008, at 09:08 PM EST by fodormik -
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  • Aggression-frustration (cursing, democracy, minority opinions, the Székelys, decision mechanisms)
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  • Sex (types of orgasm, sexual organs, as a bodily surplus or deficit
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  • Sex (types of orgasm, sexual organs, as a bodily surplus or deficit
August 23, 2008, at 03:36 PM EST by fodormik -
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  • Narrowing of the Self and ignorance of information (focussing, relationships)
  • Artificial influences on the size of the Self (smoking, boredom, drugs)
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  • Narrowing of the Self and ignorance of information (focusing, relationships)
  • Artificial influences on the size of the Self (smoking, boredom, drugs)
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  • Practising functions (cognitive schemata, ideas, archetypes, Gestalt, practising functions, dreams, being well-informed about only one topic and knowing nothing of others, nursery-school teachers, IT specialists, journalists, PR and communication experts, burnout, the age of 30, mourning, body image, sauna, bath, yoga, tennis, fencing, sports, team, national borders, harmony, intimacy, aura, double bed, Oedipus complex, complexity, empathy, truth)
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  • Function practice (cognitive schemata, ideas, archetypes)
  • dreams, being well-informed about only one topic and knowing nothing of others, nursery-school teachers, IT specialists, journalists, PR and communication experts, burnout, the age of 30, mourning, body image, sauna, bath, yoga, tennis, fencing, sports, team, national borders, harmony, intimacy, aura, double bed, Oedipus complex, complexity, empathy, truth)
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  • Enlightenment (talent, brains, career choice, the structure of national economy, national IQ, type of man in Hungary)
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  • Enlightenment (talent, strategies)
  • Different brains (career choice, the intellectual capital of a nation)
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  • Challenge (problem solving, narcissism)
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Comment: the new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the birth of the new cognitive schema deadlock

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Comment: the new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The integration is a process when the old opposing schemata fall into smaller pieces (into their composing cognitive schemata) and from these pieces a new one arises that contains the major characteristic of the two previous ones. The new is superior to the two old ones. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the birth of the new cognitive schema deadlock

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  • Rain and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff)
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  • “Singing in the rain” and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff)
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  • Rain and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff)
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  • “Singing in the rain” and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff)
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  • “Singing in the rain” and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff)
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  • Riddles (solving a riddle, interpreting the Bible)
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  • Puzzle (solving a puzzle, interpreting the Bible)
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  • Arts (aesthetics, art psychology, thriller, horror, pornography, fashion, teacher, theatre, performance, illustration)
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  • Arts (aesthetics, art psychology, thriller, horror, pornography, fashion, teacher, theatre, performance, illustration)
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Fodormik’s Paradigm for Psychology (FIPP)

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Fodormik’s Integrated Paradigm for Psychology (FIPP)

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Fodormik’s Paradigm of Psychology (FIPP)

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Fodormik’s Paradigm for Psychology (FIPP)

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MFodor’s Psychology Paradigm (MPP)

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Fodormik’s Paradigm of Psychology (FIPP)

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MPP operates with three known psychological concepts: Self, Environment and cognitive schemata. We redefine them as follows (henceforth the redefined Self and Environment concepts are indicated with capitals):

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FIPP operates with three known psychological concepts: Self, Environment and cognitive schemata. We redefine them as follows (henceforth the redefined Self and Environment concepts are indicated with capitals):

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  • The personality typology of MPP and dependencies (good, bad, aggression, detection of cheating, dependencies)
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  • The personality typology of FIPP and dependencies (good, bad, aggression, detection of cheating, dependencies)
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Below we present a model that explains a great deal of some aspects of human behaviour. The model describes diverse kinds of human behaviour – from religion to sex and from problem solving to intimate relationships – with the help of a few basic concepts. At the same time, its results are congruent with those of the determining psychological schools and sub-sciences – analytic, cognitive and social psychologies – and explain them in a broader context. It integrates knowledge of human behaviour found in common sense and the world religions, with the science of psychology. As we feel that we have managed to identify the key elements of human behaviour, we do not consider it an exaggeration to propose that our model be used as the conceptual framework of psychology.

to:

Below we present a model that explains a great deal of some aspects of human behaviour. The model describes diverse kinds of human behaviour – from religion to sex and from problem solving to intimate relationships – with the help of just a few basic concepts. At the same time, its results are congruent with those of the determining psychological schools and sub-sciences – analytic, cognitive and social psychologies – and explain them in a broader context. It integrates knowledge of human behaviour found in common sense and the world religions, with the science of psychology. As we feel that we have managed to identify the key elements of human behaviour, we do not consider it an exaggeration to propose that our model be used as the conceptual framework of psychology.

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  • Environment is what the Self perceives. (For example, a specific man called John, a crowd, an eyelash, a bug on a leaf, the eyes of a wolf in a dark forest.) As a part of the Environment, social Environment refers to that group of people which is important for the Self. For example, although there may be 20 others in a class, we may dress elegantly or behave better only for the sake of our boyfriend.
to:
  • Environment is what the Self perceives. (For example, a specific man called John, a crowd, an eyelash, a bug on a leaf, the eyes of a wolf in a dark forest.) As a part of the Environment, social Environment refers to that group of people which is important for the Self. (For example, although there may be 20 others in a class, we may dress elegantly or behave better only for the sake of our boy- or girlfriend.)
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The Self perceives its own size in relation to that of the Environment, and the proportion of these (Self resp. Environment) helps to characterize the ever changing relationship of these two entities; (for example, is the Self growing at the expense of the Environment at the moment? If it is, to what extent?) In addition, the relationship of the Self and the Environment is a key issue, as it shows the effectiveness of the adaptation of the Self i.e. how much it is subject to the Environment. (If the Self is smaller, the Environment controls it rather than vice versa.)

to:

The Self perceives its own size in relation to that of the Environment, and the proportion of these (Self resp. Environment) helps to characterize the ever changing relationship of these two entities; (for example, is the Self growing at the expense of the Environment at the moment? If it is, to what extent?) In addition, the relationship of the Self and the Environment is a key issue, as it shows the effectiveness of the adaptation of the Self i.e. how much it is subject to the Environment. (If the Self is smaller, the Environment controls it and vice versa.)

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changes the course of Self-Narrowing and converts it into Self-Expansion.'''

Comment: the new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the new cognitive schema deadlock

to:

changes the course of Self-Narrowing and converts it into Self-Expansion.'''

Comment: the new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the birth of the new cognitive schema deadlock

Changed lines 45-47 from:

Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

to:

Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment (i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

Changed line 108 from:
  • Man’s psyche is a complicated entity. and I trust so much that there is no sole truth, that I’m able to reason for and against my statements. This does not mean that these statements are untrue. Rather, it means that every single question should be judged uniquely. As there is no perfect formula in psychotherapy, only principles and basic relationships – the opposite of which sometimes prove to be true – which contribute to unique therapies. Similarly, there are no strict laws in a science so complex .
to:
  • Man’s psyche is a complicated entity and I trust so much that there is no sole truth, that I’m able to reason for and against my statements. This does not mean that these statements are untrue. Rather, it means that every single question should be judged uniquely. As there is no perfect formula in psychotherapy, only principles and basic relationships – the opposite of which sometimes prove to be true – which contribute to unique therapies. Similarly, there are no strict laws in a science so complex.
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Is there anything new in this?

to:

Is there anything new in this?

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How can we ensure that the opposite happens?

to:

How can we ensure that the opposite happens?

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June 20, 2008, at 10:16 PM EST by fodormik -
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Example 1

Changed lines 50-73 from:

1. They try all of their existing cognitive schemata – restarts the editor, computer, et al – which could be relevant, but none of these works. 2. They then ask themselves “That usually works fine, but now it does not. Am I doing something wrong?" They repeat the schemes many times without success. 3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding computers useless; "I hate stupid computers, and will use only pen and paper in future." 4. They then begin to read the buttons on the keyboard and test the effect of the unknown ones. After pressing Caps Lock, then another letter… 5. It works! "The solution is the Caps Lock key! It means capitals lock." Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive schema has been created! 6. As they see that it works, they feel: ??QUERY = BULLET POINTS ARE USUALLY SOLID AS PREVIOUSLY?? o additional energy; and o an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema. 7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the function of the new button &c. 8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important) Example 2 Let us suppose that somebody has some mathematical knowledge, and has solved hundreds of quadratic equations (e.g. x2=4 or -2x2=-8). They now face the following problem: x2=-4. What happens? 1. In using the existing cognitive schemata they realize that they do not work 2. "Am I doing something wrong?" The schema is repeated many times without success. 3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding equations as useless. 4. They then explore complex numbers; “What if I define i as a result of the equation i2=-1?” 5. It works! The solution is 2i, as (2i)2=4*(-1)=-4. Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive scheme has been created! 6. As they see that it works, they feel: ??QUERY = BULLET POINTS ARE USUALLY SOLID AS PREVIOUSLY?? o additional energy; and o an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema. 7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the use of complex numbers. 8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important)

The consequences of the model

to:
  1. They try all of their existing cognitive schemata – restarts the editor, computer, et al – which could be relevant, but none of these works.
  2. They then ask themselves “That usually works fine, but now it does not. Am I doing something wrong?" They repeat the schemes many times without success.
  3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding computers useless; "I hate stupid computers, and will use only pen and paper in future."
  4. They then begin to read the buttons on the keyboard and test the effect of the unknown ones. After pressing Caps Lock, then another letter…
  5. It works! "The solution is the Caps Lock key! It means capitals lock." Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive schema has been created!
  6. As they see that it works, they feel:
    1. additional energy; and
    2. an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema.
  7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the function of the new button &c.
  8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important)

Example 2

Let us suppose that somebody has some mathematical knowledge, and has solved hundreds of quadratic equations (e.g. x2=4 or -2x2=-8) They now face the following problem: x2=-4. What happens?

  1. In using the existing cognitive schemata they realize that they do not work
  2. "Am I doing something wrong?" The schema is repeated many times without success.
  3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding equations as useless.
  4. They then explore complex numbers; “What if I define i as a result of the equation i2=-1?”
  5. It works! The solution is 2i, as (2i)2=4*(-1)=-4. Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive scheme has been created!
  6. As they see that it works, they feel:
    1. additional energy; and
    2. an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema.
  7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the use of complex numbers.
  8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important)

The consequences of the model

Changed lines 77-105 from:

The suggested topics follow. Although these are separate texts, their sequence is not random. The key words of the topics can be found in brackets: • Arts (aesthetics, art psychology, thriller, horror, pornography, fashion, teacher, theatre, performance, illustration) • Riddles (solving a riddle, interpreting the Bible) • “Singing in the rain” and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff) • Enlightenment (talent, brains, career choice, the structure of national economy, national IQ, type of man in Hungary) • Challenge (problem solving, narcissism) • The right for anger (pro-social aggression, fanaticism, interrogation, brainwashing) • Experience of evidence (eureka phenomenon, aha effect, gossip, novelty, teaching) and the “things that sound good”, when something seems better from far away than it really is • Aggression-frustration (cursing, democracy, minority opinions, the Székelys, decision mechanisms) • Sex (types of orgasm, sexual organs, as a bodily surplus or deficit • Narrowing of the Self and ignorance of information (focussing, relationships) • Artificial influences on the size of the Self (smoking, boredom, drugs) • Intimate relationships (self-surrender, sovereignty) • Psychoanalytic theory about personality • Practising functions (cognitive schemata, ideas, archetypes, Gestalt, practising functions, dreams, being well-informed about only one topic and knowing nothing of others, nursery-school teachers, IT specialists, journalists, PR and communication experts, burnout, the age of 30, mourning, body image, sauna, bath, yoga, tennis, fencing, sports, team, national borders, harmony, intimacy, aura, double bed, Oedipus complex, complexity, empathy, truth) • Happy end • Social status and relaxing (solving a riddle, humour, creativity, comfort, the disadvantages of laziness, money) • Exploration and arousal (discovery, routine, boredom) • Groups (centre, periphery, defence, defencelessness, loneliness, group identity, power) • Cognitive schemata • Maslow’s hierarchy of needs • Freedom and happiness • Redemption (Jewry, Jesus, Christianity) • Roads to Happiness (promiscuity, religions, confession, narratives, altruism, foundations, research, art, art collecting, family, wealth, travelling, gaining knowledge, reading, collecting, death, heaven and hell) • Common frequency, harmony in communication on the level of emotions and of the body making empathy possible (hypnosis, dealing, business life, ability to climax, choosing a partner for life) • Self-control and delay i.e. what is the fun in torturing ourselves? (failures, elegance, politeness) • The personality typology of MPP and dependencies (good, bad, aggression, detection of cheating, dependencies)

to:

The suggested topics follow. (Although these are separate texts, their sequence is not random.) The key words of the topics can be found in brackets:

  • Arts (aesthetics, art psychology, thriller, horror, pornography, fashion, teacher, theatre, performance, illustration)
  • Riddles (solving a riddle, interpreting the Bible)
  • “Singing in the rain” and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff)
  • Enlightenment (talent, brains, career choice, the structure of national economy, national IQ, type of man in Hungary)
  • Challenge (problem solving, narcissism)
  • The right for anger (pro-social aggression, fanaticism, interrogation, brainwashing)
  • Experience of evidence (eureka phenomenon, aha effect, gossip, novelty, teaching) and the “things that sound good”, when something seems better from far away than it really is
  • Aggression-frustration (cursing, democracy, minority opinions, the Székelys, decision mechanisms)
  • Sex (types of orgasm, sexual organs, as a bodily surplus or deficit
  • Narrowing of the Self and ignorance of information (focussing, relationships)
  • Artificial influences on the size of the Self (smoking, boredom, drugs)
  • Intimate relationships (self-surrender, sovereignty)
  • Psychoanalytic theory about personality
  • Practising functions (cognitive schemata, ideas, archetypes, Gestalt, practising functions, dreams, being well-informed about only one topic and knowing nothing of others, nursery-school teachers, IT specialists, journalists, PR and communication experts, burnout, the age of 30, mourning, body image, sauna, bath, yoga, tennis, fencing, sports, team, national borders, harmony, intimacy, aura, double bed, Oedipus complex, complexity, empathy, truth)
  • Happy end
  • Social status and relaxing (solving a riddle, humour, creativity, comfort, the disadvantages of laziness, money)
  • Exploration and arousal (discovery, routine, boredom)
  • Groups (centre, periphery, defence, defencelessness, loneliness, group identity, power)
  • Cognitive schemata
  • Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
  • Freedom and happiness
  • Redemption (Jewry, Jesus, Christianity)
  • Roads to Happiness (promiscuity, religions, confession, narratives, altruism, foundations, research, art, art collecting, family, wealth, travelling, gaining knowledge, reading, collecting, death, heaven and hell)
  • Common frequency, harmony in communication on the level of emotions and of the body making empathy possible (hypnosis, dealing, business life, ability to climax, choosing a partner for life)
  • Self-control and delay i.e. what is the fun in torturing ourselves? (failures, elegance, politeness)
  • The personality typology of MPP and dependencies (good, bad, aggression, detection of cheating, dependencies)
Changed lines 107-112 from:

• Man’s psyche is a complicated entity. and I trust so much that there is no sole truth, that I’m able to reason for and against my statements. This does not mean that these statements are untrue. Rather, it means that every single question should be judged uniquely. As there is no perfect formula in psychotherapy, only principles and basic relationships – the opposite of which sometimes prove to be true – which contribute to unique therapies. Similarly, there are no strict laws in a science so complex .

• Reading through the whole text one may have the feeling that I am trying to force my point of view – however ethical – on others, and therefore it is merely an unscientific constraint. The one truth in this statement is that I live according to my scientific beliefs; the main source of my observations is my life. Nevertheless, I emphasize throughout that there is no perfect way, for example, in the case of reaching happiness. Apart from this I can presume which way is perfect for me, or which one suits me best, and it is possible that I cannot completely hide this. Here I state that there is no redeeming way, only that there are some ways which have more chance to redeem. In addition, I undertake this calmly as I believe that all of them are part of millennia old multicultural ethics.

Is there anything new in this?

to:
  • Man’s psyche is a complicated entity. and I trust so much that there is no sole truth, that I’m able to reason for and against my statements. This does not mean that these statements are untrue. Rather, it means that every single question should be judged uniquely. As there is no perfect formula in psychotherapy, only principles and basic relationships – the opposite of which sometimes prove to be true – which contribute to unique therapies. Similarly, there are no strict laws in a science so complex .
  • Reading through the whole text one may have the feeling that I am trying to force my point of view – however ethical – on others, and therefore it is merely an unscientific constraint. The one truth in this statement is that I live according to my scientific beliefs; the main source of my observations is my life. Nevertheless, I emphasize throughout that there is no perfect way, for example, in the case of reaching happiness. Apart from this I can presume which way is perfect for me, or which one suits me best, and it is possible that I cannot completely hide this. Here I state that there is no redeeming way, only that there are some ways which have more chance to redeem. In addition, I undertake this calmly as I believe that all of them are part of millennia old multicultural ethics.

Is there anything new in this?

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How can we ensure that the opposite happens?

to:

How can we ensure that the opposite happens?

Changed lines 119-128 from:

Competing concepts • deadlock • reference group • pride – shame • masculine – feminine • ying – yang • art – psychology • altered states of consciousness – hypnosis

to:

Competing concepts

  • deadlock
  • reference group
  • pride – shame
  • masculine – feminine
  • ying – yang
  • art – psychology
  • altered states of consciousness – hypnosis
Changed lines 130-137 from:

• the life course of paradigms • the techniques of making the Self narrow and expand • the concept and definition of psychological health • asymmetric relationships and their aims • ensuring anonymity

to:
  • the life course of paradigms
  • the techniques of making the Self narrow and expand
  • the concept and definition of psychological health
  • asymmetric relationships and their aims
  • ensuring anonymity

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June 20, 2008, at 10:08 PM EST by fodormik -
Added lines 1-136:

MFodor’s Psychology Paradigm (MPP)

Below we present a model that explains a great deal of some aspects of human behaviour. The model describes diverse kinds of human behaviour – from religion to sex and from problem solving to intimate relationships – with the help of a few basic concepts. At the same time, its results are congruent with those of the determining psychological schools and sub-sciences – analytic, cognitive and social psychologies – and explain them in a broader context. It integrates knowledge of human behaviour found in common sense and the world religions, with the science of psychology. As we feel that we have managed to identify the key elements of human behaviour, we do not consider it an exaggeration to propose that our model be used as the conceptual framework of psychology.

Principal concepts

MPP operates with three known psychological concepts: Self, Environment and cognitive schemata. We redefine them as follows (henceforth the redefined Self and Environment concepts are indicated with capitals):

  • The Self is the essence of a person that perceives the Environment.
  • Environment is what the Self perceives. (For example, a specific man called John, a crowd, an eyelash, a bug on a leaf, the eyes of a wolf in a dark forest.) As a part of the Environment, social Environment refers to that group of people which is important for the Self. For example, although there may be 20 others in a class, we may dress elegantly or behave better only for the sake of our boyfriend.
  • The cognitive schemata are the basic elements of thought. By structurally modelling the outside world they assist in the perception of the Environment for the Self (similar to a translation of the physical world to mental elements). For example, these are concepts (sleeping, solution, equation), shapes (sphere, whole, angular), categories (vertebrates, impressionist, business people) and technologies (tying bows, hitting a forehand, solving quadratic equations). The formation of a new schema creates a new model of the Environment; using that new model the Self is able to structure and perceive, control and react to its Environment.

The Self and the cognitive schemata are only partly comprehensible to others. Getting to know completely another person’s cognitive scheme is impossible, even people to using well-defined, similar schemata (e.g. the definition of the line in mathematics is very clear and precise, someone imagines and uses it as a string, another as a thin wire, and a third as a pearl necklace. Even if their concepts on the line would have been shared with others, they would also have to share their concepts of string, wire, pearl and so on.). Interpersonal communication (due to the limitations of the data transfer process), usually conveys, compared with what they have in their mind, a simplified form of cognitive schemata amongst people.

The Environment is completely subjective, and accessible only for the Self that developed and uses it. It is partly free from the physical reality since it was created by the Self deciding what it wants to perceive from it and what it does not.

Important: the independence from physical reality described above does not contradict the fact that the Self tries to model, understand and adapt to the physical world successfully through discovering its rules and relations with the help of cognitive schemata.

The Self perceives its own size in relation to that of the Environment, and the proportion of these (Self resp. Environment) helps to characterize the ever changing relationship of these two entities; (for example, is the Self growing at the expense of the Environment at the moment? If it is, to what extent?) In addition, the relationship of the Self and the Environment is a key issue, as it shows the effectiveness of the adaptation of the Self i.e. how much it is subject to the Environment. (If the Self is smaller, the Environment controls it rather than vice versa.)

The model

The model introduces two new concepts according to the relationship of the size of the Self and the Environment:

(:drawing narrow:)

  • Self-Narrowing: when the Self perceives the Environment as becoming increasingly larger and itself becoming increasingly defenceless. The extreme is the demolition of the Self by the Environment.


(:drawing broad:)

  • Self-Expanding: when the Self manages to control the Environment, and so the Environment becomes part of the Self, enriching rather than threatening it. In this way, the Self becomes bigger than the Environment. At the extreme, we can imagine the Self exploding into the Environment and destroying itself.


Important: these relationships are dynamic, and being subjective constructs they can scarcely be interpreted in terms of numbers. The emphasis is on their relationship with each other and on how the Self experiences its relationship with the Environment. (For example, although we see a heavy storm about to hit a sailboat at sea, it does not mean that the Environment – the sea – controls the Self of the captain. As long as he does not notice the storm, the captain can feel that he controls the sea and his boat)

When the Self is narrowing, its energy continuously decreases. When the Self is expanding, its energy continuously increases.

Pattern

(:drawing steps:) With the help of the concepts of Self-Narrowing and -Expanding we can characterize human behaviour in the following pattern: '''the establishment of a new cognitive scheme changes the course of Self-Narrowing and converts it into Self-Expansion.'''

Comment: the new cognitive schema typically emerges from the integration of two or more incongruous cognitive schemata. The everyday language calls the extremely narrow state of the Self preceding the new cognitive schema deadlock

Supplement to the pattern: the constraint of communication

Following the establishment of the new cognitive schema the Self expands only for a short time as long as the Self does not hand it on to its social Environment i.e. it is retained for itself). If the Self begins to spread the new cognitive schema, the Self continues to expand. During the process of expansion, energy is generated, which is used in spreading the new cognitive schema.

Examples

Let us suppose that somebody has basic IT knowledge; knows how to switch on a computer, use a text editor and to save and print the typed text. They then encounter the following problem: any button he/she presses on the keyboard is shown on the monitor only in upper-case letters. What then happens? 1. They try all of their existing cognitive schemata – restarts the editor, computer, et al – which could be relevant, but none of these works. 2. They then ask themselves “That usually works fine, but now it does not. Am I doing something wrong?" They repeat the schemes many times without success. 3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding computers useless; "I hate stupid computers, and will use only pen and paper in future." 4. They then begin to read the buttons on the keyboard and test the effect of the unknown ones. After pressing Caps Lock, then another letter… 5. It works! "The solution is the Caps Lock key! It means capitals lock." Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive schema has been created! 6. As they see that it works, they feel: ??QUERY = BULLET POINTS ARE USUALLY SOLID AS PREVIOUSLY?? o additional energy; and o an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema. 7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the function of the new button &c. 8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important) Example 2 Let us suppose that somebody has some mathematical knowledge, and has solved hundreds of quadratic equations (e.g. x2=4 or -2x2=-8). They now face the following problem: x2=-4. What happens? 1. In using the existing cognitive schemata they realize that they do not work 2. "Am I doing something wrong?" The schema is repeated many times without success. 3. Deadlock comes: they are close to giving up, and consider their cognitive schemata regarding equations as useless. 4. They then explore complex numbers; “What if I define i as a result of the equation i2=-1?” 5. It works! The solution is 2i, as (2i)2=4*(-1)=-4. Eureka feeling ensues: a new cognitive scheme has been created! 6. As they see that it works, they feel: ??QUERY = BULLET POINTS ARE USUALLY SOLID AS PREVIOUSLY?? o additional energy; and o an urge to communicate this to those who can appreciate their previous efforts and can profit from their new cognitive schema. 7. Using their additional energy they begin to communicate; looking for friends, telling room-mates about the use of complex numbers. 8. As they communicate so they feel increasingly happy, and the pride of owning and using a tool so that they can control their Environment (that part of their interest that they feel is important)

The consequences of the model In the future, we will examine the utility of the model by comparing it with our empirical experience. Hence, we attempt to apply the model in various fields of life, and to examine the extent to which our model matches psychological theory.

The suggested topics follow. Although these are separate texts, their sequence is not random. The key words of the topics can be found in brackets: • Arts (aesthetics, art psychology, thriller, horror, pornography, fashion, teacher, theatre, performance, illustration) • Riddles (solving a riddle, interpreting the Bible) • “Singing in the rain” and altruism (altruism, aggression, communication in team, smoking a spliff) • Enlightenment (talent, brains, career choice, the structure of national economy, national IQ, type of man in Hungary) • Challenge (problem solving, narcissism) • The right for anger (pro-social aggression, fanaticism, interrogation, brainwashing) • Experience of evidence (eureka phenomenon, aha effect, gossip, novelty, teaching) and the “things that sound good”, when something seems better from far away than it really is • Aggression-frustration (cursing, democracy, minority opinions, the Székelys, decision mechanisms) • Sex (types of orgasm, sexual organs, as a bodily surplus or deficit • Narrowing of the Self and ignorance of information (focussing, relationships) • Artificial influences on the size of the Self (smoking, boredom, drugs) • Intimate relationships (self-surrender, sovereignty) • Psychoanalytic theory about personality • Practising functions (cognitive schemata, ideas, archetypes, Gestalt, practising functions, dreams, being well-informed about only one topic and knowing nothing of others, nursery-school teachers, IT specialists, journalists, PR and communication experts, burnout, the age of 30, mourning, body image, sauna, bath, yoga, tennis, fencing, sports, team, national borders, harmony, intimacy, aura, double bed, Oedipus complex, complexity, empathy, truth) • Happy end • Social status and relaxing (solving a riddle, humour, creativity, comfort, the disadvantages of laziness, money) • Exploration and arousal (discovery, routine, boredom) • Groups (centre, periphery, defence, defencelessness, loneliness, group identity, power) • Cognitive schemata • Maslow’s hierarchy of needs • Freedom and happiness • Redemption (Jewry, Jesus, Christianity) • Roads to Happiness (promiscuity, religions, confession, narratives, altruism, foundations, research, art, art collecting, family, wealth, travelling, gaining knowledge, reading, collecting, death, heaven and hell) • Common frequency, harmony in communication on the level of emotions and of the body making empathy possible (hypnosis, dealing, business life, ability to climax, choosing a partner for life) • Self-control and delay i.e. what is the fun in torturing ourselves? (failures, elegance, politeness) • The personality typology of MPP and dependencies (good, bad, aggression, detection of cheating, dependencies)

Two comments on the relevant texts • Man’s psyche is a complicated entity. and I trust so much that there is no sole truth, that I’m able to reason for and against my statements. This does not mean that these statements are untrue. Rather, it means that every single question should be judged uniquely. As there is no perfect formula in psychotherapy, only principles and basic relationships – the opposite of which sometimes prove to be true – which contribute to unique therapies. Similarly, there are no strict laws in a science so complex .

• Reading through the whole text one may have the feeling that I am trying to force my point of view – however ethical – on others, and therefore it is merely an unscientific constraint. The one truth in this statement is that I live according to my scientific beliefs; the main source of my observations is my life. Nevertheless, I emphasize throughout that there is no perfect way, for example, in the case of reaching happiness. Apart from this I can presume which way is perfect for me, or which one suits me best, and it is possible that I cannot completely hide this. Here I state that there is no redeeming way, only that there are some ways which have more chance to redeem. In addition, I undertake this calmly as I believe that all of them are part of millennia old multicultural ethics.

Is there anything new in this? As I think that we are speaking about obvious and well-known things, it may be perceived that we are merely re-invented the wheel.

How can we ensure that the opposite happens? We examine similar and opposite models, and find out if they are more precise than our theory. As our hypothesis is that we are inspecting the deep roots of real life, we are not allowed to scorn human experience collected throughout millennia by saying that it says nothing scientific. Rather, my assumption is that human cultures, via poetry and philosophy, have always felt that which is being discussed, but have never put it in words so precisely. Furthermore, it has been never placed according to the rules of psychology or other sciences.

Competing concepts • deadlock • reference group • pride – shame • masculine – feminine • ying – yang • art – psychology • altered states of consciousness – hypnosis

Further thoughts (to help obtain a deeper understanding of the model) • the life course of paradigms • the techniques of making the Self narrow and expand • the concept and definition of psychological health • asymmetric relationships and their aims • ensuring anonymity